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Self-Employed Taxes in Canada: How Much to Set Aside for CPP, EI & Income Tax

So…I wrote this blog post about self-employed taxes in Canada over two years ago, mainly because I couldn’t find a resource quite like it when I first became self-employed in 2017. Fast-forward to 2020 and it’s still my most popular blog post! I still get emails and comments all the time about it, so I thought it was time for a bit of an update.

My Experience with Self-Employed Taxes in Canada

When I first wrote this blog post, I had just finished my first year of self-employment. For some backstory, I quit my corporate job in marketing in November 2016 and officially started working for myself in January 2017. It’s now May 2020, which means I’ve been successfully working for myself for 3 and a half years.

It’s crazy to see how fast time has flown by since that first year of self-employment. Looking back, in all honesty, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Although I saved up about a year’s worth of living expenses into my Emergency Fund and had earned just over $30,000 from my side hustle in 2016 (which proved to myself I could earn a full-time living if I dedicated full-time hours to my business), I really didn’t have much of a plan. I don’t have a formal business background, I’ve never even taken a business class, and I’m completely self-taught when it comes to running a business. Luckily, you don’t need a business degree to be a successful business owner! I’m sure it helps, but it’s not essential.

You see, there are so many great free and reasonably priced courses and resources out there, anyone can learn this stuff if you have the self-discipline to do so! In retrospect, I probably knew more than I gave myself credit for. But what I will say is experience helps. The longer you run your business and continue to educate yourself, the easier it gets. I’m so much more organized and efficient now compared to that first year. Not to mention, I’ve almost tripled my business revenue!

And if you’re curious about what the heck my business actually consists of, I made a video that goes in-depth about it. But for the quick version, my business includes:

  • Content creation (blog, podcast, videos, social media)
  • Freelance writing
  • Public speaking
  • Selling digital products and courses
  • Providing financial counselling services to individual/couple clients
  • Running my Millennial Money Meetup® event series

Paying Taxes When You’re Self-Employed vs. an Employee

So, what’s the big difference between being an employee earning a paycheque at a company compared to being self-employed? Well, when you’re self-employed, that means that you become fully responsible for setting aside money to pay your income taxes and contribute to the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). It also means you have to pay that money directly to the government via your CRA My Account. When you’re an employee, your employer deals with all that for you by taking a percentage off your gross pay and submitting it to the government on your behalf.

That’s why when you’re an employee, you shouldn’t have a tax bill to pay after you file your taxes. If your employer took off the right amount of money from your pay, your tax bill should $0. Or, in most cases, they’ll have taken off too much and/or you’ll be eligible for some tax deductions and credits, thus providing you with a tax refund. A tax refund simply means you’ve overpaid on your taxes, so the government is paying you back. That’s right, a tax refund is not free money! It’s literally the government giving you back your own money.

When you’re self-employed, you’ll always have a tax bill to pay because you won’t have an employer doing all that work for you. Instead, when you become your own boss, you also become your own bookkeeper and accountant (unless you choose to hire someone to do that for you). Luckily, it’s not that complicated or much work to do on your own. Believe me, I’ve been doing my own bookkeeping for almost 4 years. The only thing I get help with is I hire a tax accountant to help me file my taxes every year (and she’s worth every penny!).

Looking for a Self-Employed Budget Spreadsheet?

How to Know If You’re Self-Employed

There are a ton of different terms for being self-employed, so I want to start with clearing some things up. If you’re a freelancer, if you’re a small business owner, or even if you have a side hustle, all of those would fall under the umbrella of self-employed. Self-employed simply means you are earning income by yourself, outside of an employer.

That being said, there are a few exceptions in which you aren’t self-employed but still need to set aside money for income taxes. For instance, if you earn cash tips from your job, that is considered taxable income. Not only do you need to claim that cash as income when filing your taxes, but you also need to pay tax on it. The same goes for if you do any cash gigs. For instance, if you’re a musician and get paid for your performance in cash, that cash is considered taxable income that you need to claim and pay taxes on. If you do not claim any cash you earn as income on your taxes, that is considered tax evasion and is illegal.

Another example would be if you are a hired contract worker for a company. In some instances, the company will pay you regularly as if you are a normal employee, but they won’t take any tax or CPP off your paycheque. In this case, you may not be self-employed in the traditional sense, but you would be in the sense that you have to save a percentage of your pay for tax time.

And since I mentioned side hustles, if you work a full-time job for a company, but in your spare time you have a side hustle, it’s on you to save a percentage of your side hustle income for tax time as well. I remember the first year I earned money from my blog, I had no idea I had to do this! When I filed my taxes, I was hit with a bill of a few hundred dollars and I felt like such an idiot. So no matter what your side hustle is (running an Etsy store, consulting, freelance writing, Uber driving), remember that you need to save some money for income taxes and CPP contributions.

For more info, check out this article on the government’s website about tax obligations for self-employed individuals.

What You’re Required to Pay as a Self-Employed Individual

Okay, with all of that knowledge in your head now, let’s talk about what you’re on the hook to pay to the government come tax time. When you’re self-employed, and you’re operating your business as a sole proprietorship, you must pay:

  • Personal income tax on your business’ earnings minus business expenses
  • Contributions to the Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
  • Contributions to Employment Insurance (EI) voluntary

How to Calculate How Much You’ll Owe If You’re Self-Employed

Let’s talk specifics here. You may think that you have to pay tax on every dollar your business earns, but that’s actually not the case. You’re only required to pay income tax on your business’ earnings after business expenses. Moreover, you can lower your average tax rate and thus your tax bill even more by taking advantage of other personal tax deductions and tax credits, such as claiming some of your RRSP contributions as deductions.

For example:

Let’s say you’re a self-employed web designer in Ontario and you earned $100,000 in business revenue. Business revenue is the total amount of income your business generated by selling goods and/or services. Business revenue does not include any sales tax collected (that’s completely separate).

You spent $30,000 on business expenses and operating costs.

That leaves you with $70,000 in business earnings after expenses. Using SimpleTax’s free calculator, you’ll find that your average tax rate would be 26.66%, and you should set aside $18,662 to pay your federal and provincial taxes and your CPP premiums.

Now, let’s say you also contributed $10,000 to your RRSP which you claim as a tax deduction.

As you can see, your RRSP deduction lowered your average tax rate to 22.42%, thus decreasing your tax bill to only $15,697.

Although this calculator is great, I would suggest just using it as a reference point to determine a percentage you should be putting aside for income taxes and CPP. You may owe less, you may owe more. But it’s important that throughout the year you keep track of your business revenue and expenses, and adjust your tax savings if necessary.

Moreover, having been doing this for several years now, I personally always aim to save more than I need to. I never want to find myself in a situation where I owe more than I have saved, and am forced to dip into my personal Emergency Fund to pay part of my tax bill. So, if I was in the example above, I’d probably round up those average tax rates to 28% or 25% just to be safe.

In my experience, I’ve found it better to be safe than sorry. Plus, if you over save, there’s your “tax refund” (sort of). If you save more than you need to for taxes, then you have extra money to play with. Or, you can be boring like me and just put that extra money into the following year’s tax savings account.

How to Calculate Your CPP Contributions

Personally, I just use the SimpleTax calculator to ensure I’m saving enough for income taxes and my Canada Pension Plan contributions, but if you’re curious how the math works, here goes!

For your CPP premiums, you are required to pay these if you are 18 or older and earn more than $3,500/year. It’s also interesting to note that if you are an employee, you only pay half of your CPP premiums (5.25%) and your employer pays the other half. When you’re self-employed, you aren’t so lucky and have to pay the full 10.5%. You are required to pay 10.5% on your gross income (business revenue – business expenses), minus the $3,500 basic exemption amount. Here’s an example:

You earned $100,000 in business revenue

You spent $30,000 on business expenses and operating costs

You’re left with $70,000 in business earnings after expenses

Subtract the $3,500 basic exemption amount to equal $66,500

Multiply $66,500 by 10.5% to equal $6,982.50

$100,000 (business revenue) – $30,000 (business expenses) = $70,000 – $3,500 (basic exemption amount) = $66,500 x 10.5% = $6,982.50

But that’s not all! There is actually a ceiling for CPP premiums. The maximum amount a self-employed individual can contribute to CPP is $5,796/year as of 2020. Which means instead of $6,982.50, you would actually only owe the maximum contribution amount which is $5,796.

Since CPP contribution amounts change every year, to keep up to date check out this CPP contribution rates, maximums and exemptions page on the government’s website.

How to Calculate Your EI Contributions

I want to make it clear that contributing to the EI program is not mandatory when you’re self-employed. It is 100% voluntary. However, by not contributing to EI, that means you are ineligible to take advantage of all the benefits EI has to offer, such as maternity/parental leave or being a caregiver to a family member who is ill or injured. Then again, it may not be worth it to you and instead you may prefer to just have a very cushy Emergency Fund.

But if you are interested in it, here’s how much it costs. For self-employed individuals, as of 2020, the EI rate is 1.58%. This means that for every $100 you earn, you need to pay $1.58, to a maximum of $856.36/year (or maximum insurable earnings of $54,200). And for insurable earnings, this refers to your gross salary, or your business revenue after you’ve deducted business expenses but before you’ve paid income tax and CPP.

Using my earlier example:

You earned $100,000 in business revenue

You spent $30,000 on business expenses and operating costs

You’re left with $70,000 in business earnings after expenses

$70,000 x 1.58% = $1,106

Since $1,106 exceeds the maximum EI contribution amount, you would then just pay the maximum amount of $856.36 for EI. To play around with different scenarios, you can check out this free EI calculator.

To learn more, visit this page about EI special benefits for self-employed individuals on the government’s website.

Final Thoughts

This has been a major post, so if you actually read it all, word for word, you are a rock star! Not only that, now you’re way more informed than most self-employed people. High-fives all around for that!

But again, if you’ve got to do your self-employed taxes in Canada and are still confused about things, feel free to email me or leave your question in the comments and I’ll try my best to help you find an answer or solution.

I will be coming out with more blog posts and videos on other self-employed finance topics, so to keep in the loop make sure to subscribe to my email newsletter.

Is it your first time filing self-employed taxes in Canada? What are your concerns or questions? Let me know if you can’t find the answers here and I can write a follow-up blog post!

Self-Employed Taxes in Canada: How Much to Set Aside for CPP, EI & Income Tax
Disclosure: Nothing on my website or affiliated channels should be considered advice or an endorsement, and some content may include affiliate links in which I may earn a commission at no extra cost to you. Please read my disclaimer to learn more.
Showing 60 comments
  • Jessica
    Reply

    THANK YOU!!!! This was so helpful! Book marking this for tax time.

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      So glad you found it helpful!

    • Mel
      Reply

      Okay, so I’m viewing this years later.
      I Googled and this came up.

      Even though it has some information I already knew, it does make me feel relieved that I’m doing at least some if not all of it right? Thanks for this!! Helps calm my nerves about tax time. I have money saved away, which also makes me nervous, hahaha. I always look at my account thinking “Is it enough?!”.

      • Jessica Moorhouse
        Reply

        Nice! So glad this post helped calm your nerves and confirmed some things for you that you already knew so you can be confident doing what you’re doing already. 🙂

  • Sam Devlin
    Reply

    Thanks, I have a follow up question. If you make under $30000 and do not have a HST number and have high expenses particularly in the first few years to get set up. Is it possible to get a self employment tax return?

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      So you’re asking if you earn under $30,000, can you still claim business expenses as tax deductions? Absolutely. If you are running a business, be it a full-time business or a side hustle on top of your corporate day job, yes you can claim business expenses for that self-employed income. It has nothing to do with HST. A great calculator to play with is https://simpletax.ca/calculator

    • Quicani
      Reply

      Thanks! This has broadened my understanding of self-employed taxes

      • Jessica Moorhouse
        Reply

        Glad I could help!

        • Roxanne Bourgaize
          Reply

          Thank you!!! Your wonderful and I understand you more than anyone else. I am doing home care for seniors, I want to pay all taxes, especially CPP. I only have a few clients and it’s not tons of money, should I open a business account so I can claim gas and uniforms? Or skip that and just pay my taxes annually. As I said it isnt alot but really need to pay into CPP.

          • Jessica Moorhouse

            What do you mean by business account? Like a business bank account? If you’re a sole proprietor operating your business under your personal name you don’t need to do that. You can just use your personal bank accounts and credit cards. And if you are earning self-employed income, then you are required to pay tax and CPP. If you’re a sole proprietor, you don’t have to set up anything to do this. Just make sure you claim that income on your personal income taxes, and save receipts for any business expenses to use as deductions. Here’s a list of business expenses you can claim: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/businesses/topics/sole-proprietorships-partnerships/business-expenses.html

    • Marissa
      Reply

      Yes, you can get a tax refund if you make under $30,00/year!
      So instead of owing, you’ll most likely get a refund (even if your self-employed)
      I believe that’s what you were asking? 🙂

  • April
    Reply

    Really helpful thanks just took the leap from employee to entrepreneur and this broke it down really well

  • Rachel
    Reply

    Hi Jessica,
    This is a super helpful article – thank you!
    So, just to clarify, you should put aside 25% of your net income for income tax, and an additional 9.9% (think it has now gone up to 10.2%) for CPP?
    I was assuming the CPP would be included in the 25% I put aside, but it would appear I am wrong. My first year doing taxes as a freelancer – it’s a steep learning curve! 🙂

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      Nope you’re right, include CPP in the amount you’re saving for income tax. But honestly, 25% is just a general number. What I would suggest instead is estimate what your gross income is (minus business deductions), then use a tax calculator like simpletax.ca/calculator to get a more accurate percentage of what to put aside for income tax and CPP.

      • Rachel
        Reply

        Great! Thanks so much!

  • Jocelyn
    Reply

    Hi Jessica,

    If I have a full-time salaried job where they automatically deduct EI, does that mean I have to pay EI on my side hustle? Or can I choose not to pay EI on that amount? I don’t expect to make a ton of money and am just doing it for some extra spending money so I’d like to keep as much of it as possible. Thanks!

  • Mel
    Reply

    I’m a student and looking into getting into transcriptionist for over the summer and during a full time work load. I don’t except to make that much money so I am just wondering if you know anything about it and if you think it would be worth it after taxes? I couldn’t afford to have a huge tax bill while in school so would it be accurate if I were to make 6,000$ in a year that if I saved 25% that that would be enough to cover the taxes on it?
    Just wondering if you have any advice on getting into self income options.

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      It’s always worth it to make money! And 25% is just a general number, that’s why I suggest plugging in your actual numbers into a tax calculator like this: https://simpletax.ca/calculator. If you were to earn $6,000 in self-employed income in a year, your average tax rate would be 4.25%, meaning you’d have to pay $255 in taxes leaving you with $5,745 in after-tax income. Definitely worth it!

  • Paula
    Reply

    Hi Jessica. Glad I found this blog. Question – if I am freelancing/self-employed, do I need to register a business, or just file taxes as ‘self- employed?

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      If you’re a sole proprietor running a business under your personal name, no you do not need to register your business. And when filing your taxes as a self-employed person, or even if you just have a side hustle, it’s fairly straight-forward if you use tax software or work with an accountant.

  • Praba Pillai
    Reply

    A very good article Jessica. Came in handy as I recently lost my job after being employed full-time for the last 15 years. There is an offer for me to start a 6 month contract position in a financial institution. I was told to incorporate to get paid. I have been reading a lot if I should incorporate or be self-employed. The CRA website has loads of information for sole prop, partnerships and self-employed but it assumes you are one or the other. It does not assist you in deciding on selecting if you should incorporate or not.
    I live in AB, the job offer is 6 months contract position, I invoice them bi-weekly for the hours worked + GST. My question is should I be Incorporated or Self-Employed? Maybe its just terminologies but am I right to assume Self-Employed is the same as Sole prop?
    A follow-up on your response to Paula that we do not need to register a Sole Prop. How about the GST then? I thought I need a business number to remit the GST. Any assistance is much appreciated.

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      Being self-employed simply means you work for yourself and run your own business (you are not an employee working for a company). In which case, you could be self-employed and run your business as either a sole proprietorship or incorporation. In terms of which one should you do, there are many differences between a sole proprietorship and incorporation. I would suggest connecting with a tax specialist who helps small businesses (the Wellth Company is one suggestion), or you can also check out more resources on Ownr.co, a website that helps you register your business.

      As to your second question, you only need to register your sole proprietorship if you wish to use a name other than your personal name for your business. Registering your business and registering for GST/HST are separate things. And as mentioned on the government website, if you want to register for GST/HST and do not already have a business number, they will give you one when you register for GST/HST.

      https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/businesses/topics/gst-hst-businesses/account-register.html

      Good luck!

  • Shannon Mackelson
    Reply

    Great blog, Thanks! My question is, the 9 digit business no. that I had set up online through CRA website (no accounts under that number yet – according to CRA phone rep.); so it that the same no. as my GST no.? I had read that the term Business No. and GST No. we’re same and are often referred to either way. Can you confirm or clarify this?
    Thanks, appreciate it!
    Shannon

  • Amanda
    Reply

    Hi Jessica,
    Very helpful and well-written blog post, thanks for that!
    I am from Ontario and have begun doing freelance work for a design company in Ontario while working remotely (abroad). If the company I do design work for actually uses those designs to sell to a client and they already charge sales tax on that item to the client, do I need to also be including HST in my invoices to the company for said design?
    Thanks!

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      Hi Amanda, great question. Yes, you still need to charge your client HST, even if they sell your designs and charge their customers HST.

  • Vanessa
    Reply

    Thank you! So helpful!

  • free spirit
    Reply

    Hi Jessica, great post! Will the CPP amount be automatically calculated in my refund owing if I am using an online tax program like ufile or do I have to do something separately to make sure it’s paid? thanks! F

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      Yes, that’s right. CPP won’t be separate from your income tax owed (or refund), and if you’re using online tax software if it will automatically calculate everything for you.

      • free spirit
        Reply

        Great, thanks so much!

  • Michelle
    Reply

    Hi Jessica, I just received a job offer and they want me to be incorporated?
    I have no idea how to do any of this lol. I live in AB and will be providing my services in BC, I will be receiving $300 per day sub pay (non taxable) on top of $35 per hour (10 hr days) and also 4% vacation paid out weekly. What would my obligations be for CPP, EI, Income tax and GST? Am I required to pay WCB also? And how do I track everything? Am I able to write off my vehicle, mortgage, fuel etc? Please help

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      For your situation, I would get in contact with an accountant to help and guide you.

  • Ron Bowman
    Reply

    Hi Jessica, I’m on Ontario Disability Support Program, but I also just became self employed. They didn’t kick me off disability, but they did lower my check.

    I just filed taxes in March. I wasn’t self employed till April 2. Do I have to file again by June for my self employment taxes? And how do you pay them if you owe money back?

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      If you weren’t self-employed until April 2, 2020, then no you don’t need to refile your 2019 taxes. You’ll just have to file as a self-employed person for your 2020 taxes (which you’ll file in the 2021 tax season).

  • Ron Bowman
    Reply

    Thanks for replying. Great information.

  • Sarah
    Reply

    So no matter how much you made you still have to file taxes, but if you make under a certain amount, are you not required to pay taxes on it? And if so, how much would that be?
    Thank you

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      Even if you don’t earn any income, you should still file your tax return. And if you earn any amount of income, you are legally required to pay income taxes on that money. However, if you do not earn an income or earn very little income, you can claim the Basic Personal Amount non-refundable tax credit when filing your taxes. This is the amount you can earn without paying any income tax. For your 2020 taxes, the federal Basic Personal Amount is $13,229 (meaning if you make this amount or less, you do not have to pay federal income tax). The provincial Basic Personal Amount varies per province.

      • Sarah
        Reply

        Jessica thank you so so much, I really appreciate you for responding to my comment, and answering my question!

        • Jessica Moorhouse
          Reply

          Happy to help! 🙂

        • Jeny
          Reply

          Lets say I work for myself and contract myself to different jobs. I make 450k a year. Imagine I had zero deductions (obviously I will have some, but pretend I dont). How much is the MAXIMUM possible amount of income tqx I would pay on 450k without any deductions (in NS if that matters). Thinking ahead. Thanks

          • Jessica Moorhouse

            Using SimpleTax’s free calculator it looks like your average tax rate would be 47.54%, so that would mean you’d owe $213,942 in taxes. I’d play around with the calculator to get a better sense for different scenarios. https://simpletax.ca/calculator

  • Jessica
    Reply

    Hi Jessica. Great article. Very helpful. Navigating the waters as a new small business owner is super confusing.

    I have a question regarding quarterly taxes — I’m a freelancer and I’m wondering if I have to start paying quarterly taxes in my first year or if I just claim/pay taxes at the regular tax time in one lump sum in my first year?

    Thanks

  • NIshanta
    Reply

    Hi, I have heard that people register a business and then write a pay cheque from that business to themselves. Do you think that is a better way to do things? Also did you resister a business yourself or did you just transition to working by yourself using your name. I work for a company in the US as a consultant and I work from home. Apparently I am self employed. So I am wondering if I should register a small business.

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      I’m a sole proprietor, but I did register my business under the name Jessica Moorhouse (that’s my maiden name, I use my married name for my personal life and accounts). I think what you’re referring to in terms of writing yourself a paycheque is if your business is incorporated. If you’re a sole proprietor, your business money is your personal money so there would be no difference there. If you choose to work under your personal name, you don’t need to register a business name. You can just start working under your name.

  • Aminaz
    Reply

    SUPER helpful! Thank you so much!

  • Jo-Anne
    Reply

    Hi Jessica. This blog is great! Thank you so much. My question is, my business is under my name so I don’t need to register, but then how to I contribute to CPP in order to have that benefit? I am currently setting up my self-employed EI contributions but not sure if I need to set up CPP?

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      There’s nothing extra to set up. It will be calculated how much you owe when you file your taxes.

  • Abigail
    Reply

    Hi Jessica, this is my first year claiming for self employed income. Is it possible to owe NO money to taxes because you’ve written off so much in business expenses or do you always owe something?

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      Yes, if you don’t earn a profit from your business (your business expenses equal the same amount as your revenue), or you end up with a net loss (your business expenses exceed your revenue), then you effectively you wouldn’t have any income to claim and thus wouldn’t owe any taxes.

  • Mercedes
    Reply

    Hi Jessica! This article is SO helpful. I have a quick question. I am going to be launching my gifting company in October 2020. I don’t plan on making more than 30K this year (or maybe not even any year as this is my side business). Would I have to charge taxes on all of my products? I do have an HST account through CRA. Thank you, Mercedes.

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      So you’ve already registered for a GST/HST account through the CRA for your business? If that’s the case, then you do have to charge your customers GST/HST because you’ve registered. It doesn’t matter how much you earn. Once you register, you must collect and remit sales tax. If you hadn’t registered, then the $30,000 threshold would have applied.

  • Samantha Schmidt
    Reply

    Hi Jessica,
    Thanks for all the information. Can you explain when I might have to start paying in instalments? Is it in my first year? I started in Feb 2020, and have already made close to 30000. I am offering educational services so from what I read no HsT needs to be charged but I did see that it is my responsibility to pay in instalments or risk paying the interest on late payments. Or is this only after the first year is filed and they send me a letter telling me to do so. Can you confirm this?

  • Jadessah SB
    Reply

    Hi Jessica,
    Thank you so much for this informative post.
    I registered my business, as to avoid anyone from taking my name. I definitely won’t be making more than 30k, I’m thinking 10k-15k however I do work for a company with an annual salary of $42 500. With that said, since I’m operating my business as a sole proprietorship, when doing my taxes I will need to combine both incomes together correct? How much taxes would I need to pay on that amount? I currently only pay about ~1000/year since I contribute to my RRSP, and I am located in Quebec.
    Thank you!

    • Jessica Moorhouse
      Reply

      I’d suggest using a tax calculator like https://simpletax.ca/calculator to determine how much you should save from your self-employed income. Your employer should automatically deduct taxes from your pay, so you just need to set aside money to pay your self-employed taxes. With that calculator, you can plug in your employment income and your estimation of self-employed income, it will give you an estimate of your average tax rate (i.e. 25%) and then that should be the percentage you set aside from your self-employed income.

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